Other Things To Consider When Buying A Mouse

You’ve done your research. You knew what you are looking for based on what you’ll use the mouse for. You’ve decided between a wireless mouse or a wired one. You’ve considered the dimension and the size. And of course, you’ve chosen the right shape and color for you (or maybe overlooked them because you decided they’re the last things to worry about). So now you might ask, can I proceed to the counter now? You can. If those are the only things you want to cover. Wait, there’s more? Yes. More specific criteria that is.

 

Mouse, like other parts of your computer, is still a machine. It has its technical and mechanical aspects. And if you are more on the picky side, then you might appreciate this article.

 

Sensors. The sensor type will depend on the manufacturer of the mouse.

From Razer’s “Dual Sensors” to Microsoft’s “BlueTrack” and Logitech’s “Darkfield,” advanced sensors offer a lot. On the gaming side of things, most companies offer calibration for different surfaces, insanely high DPI (covered later in this guide) and improved precision. And for the always-on-the-go office worker, some mice offer to work for you even on shiny surfaces like glass, marble and more.

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

The positioning of the sensors is also crucial. The sensors must be positioned in the center of the mouse.

The off-center sensor, however, resulted in extremely poor accuracy when making sharp flicks to the left or right.

Unless you are using your mouse for casual browsing only, do watch out for sensor placement. Look for a photo of the bottom of the mouse before your purchase. If the sensor is positioned too far from the center of the mouse – stay away!

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

Buttons. The different types and placements are vital as well. Again, it comes down to what you’ll use the mouse for.

Depending on how you use your mouse, you may need to consider the types of buttons and switches used. For late night web surfing or a

5 Tips for Improving Workplace Security and Safety

Your employees are part of the assets you have within your enterprise, and your customers, on the other hand, are the lifeblood of your business, which explains the importance of the safety and security  of both workers and clients. Individuals who work in a well maintained and safe environment are also more productive than those who operate in insecure and unsafe surroundings.

Assuring customers and staff members of their safety and security and that of their belongings when they are within your premises should be part of your priorities, and here are some tips that can make that a possibility.

1. Inculcate A Culture of Safety and Security

Sometimes, you may not be aware of some of the health hazards or security loopholes that exist in-house as an employer, which is why you should consider engaging your staff members in reporting safety issues and highlighting potential security risks. One of the ways you can bring your employees aboard on matters affecting their safety at the workplace is by adopting a reward program that imparts a culture of safety and security.

When your employees become conscious of their safety and security with the help of a reward program, cases of injury, loss of company property, losing personal items, as well as illnesses, will become a rare occurrence.

2. Adhere to The Set Rules and Regulations

The law stipulates that every organization should observe the set safety and security regulations to ensure that such environments are safe for all. Local rules and regulations on workplace safety and security address such things as joint health and safety committees for large entities, premises maintenance, first aid kits and training, emergency plans, among other things.

Researching the demands of local authorities regarding safety and security at the workplace from relevant sites is critical to ensure that you conform with such regulations because they protect both your staff and clients.

3. Install Verified Security Systems

Investing in a verified security system to secure your organization from intruders and address issues of pilferage among other safety and …

The Basics Of Choosing The Best Computer Mouse

Can’t you just buy the first thing you see? After all, they all have a left clicker, a right clicker, and a scrolling wheel, right? Yes to the latter but no to the former. Much like choosing a computer, a smartphone, or even a camera, you have to consider what you will be using it for. The price and color can just come next.

 

Buying a mouse can be tricky especially online. You only get to see descriptions and pictures of it. There are reviews from some other people that have purchased and probably used it. But you simply can’t rely solely on them. How they use their mouse might be different from how you use yours. But how about going to a physical store? That would be easy right? Yes, it can, if you know what you are looking for. If you do your research before going to the store, finding a mouse would be much easier.

 

As mentioned, the first thing you should consider is what you will be using the mouse mostly for. It can be for work, gaming, or just regular surfing.

A mistake I made when first looking for my best mouse was that I was only looking for gaming products. My train of thought was “I have a gaming mouse now, so let’s just find a better one!”. But I realized that games were now far from priority – I was using my computer mostly for work. Although more complex tasks require their fair share of precision, you don’t necessarily need the “unmatched performance” of a gaming mouse. It was at that moment I could almost put my current gaming mouse to my ear and hear the marketing team laughing at me for spending my money on some shiny LEDs and a logo.

(Via:https://www.groovypost.com/howto/guide-to-find-best-mouse-to-fit-your-needs/)

 

Size and weight. This matters because if you are a gamer and you need to shot a moving zombie straight in the head, you’ll need a more accurate mouse. And smaller mice aren’t always. Wireless …

Why Wi-Fi 6 alone isn’t enough for hotels

As a frequent business traveler, I typically spend just as many hours working from hotel rooms around the world as I do from my office in Dallas, Texas. And even though I have a heavily vested interest in the cabling infrastructure market due to my position at CommScope, when I am working from a hotel room my best option for connectivity is typically provided over a Wi-Fi connection. The challenging part of my expectation is that my requirements for robust connectivity do not change based on my location. I am regularly logged in over the corporate VPN to email, CRM and a variety of other network applications, all while trying to participate in a video meeting over the very same connection.   

hotel

Similarly, much of my family and parenting time when traveling is handled in the same fashion. Having three teen/tween kids who prefer to interact over FaceTime, the model typically works okay assuming that my connectivity is solid. To complete my total and complete dependence on robust internet connectivity when I’m on the road, my downtime typically involves streaming my favorite Netflix, Amazon Prime or Hulu shows on my iPad…once again over Wi-Fi.

I guess you can say that there is nothing particularly unique about this model or the volume of content that I consume daily. I’m just one of the thousands of road warriors whose expectations and requirements for reliable bandwidth increase each and every day.

Hotel Backend Infrastructure

Because of my profession, I am also a road warrior who fully understands and appreciates that many of the hotels I stay in have invested heavily to install next-generation wireless access points (APs) to accommodate this ever-growing trend of data consumption. In theory, these access points should enable guests and staff to enjoy a fast and reliable connection throughout the hotel in guest rooms, business centers, restaurants, gyms, and lobbies. In fact, this feature is no longer “nice to have” but rather a hard requirement to keep rooms occupied with business travelers. I also realize that simply installing new …

Why Wi-Fi 6 alone isn’t enough for hotels

As a frequent business traveler, I typically spend just as many hours working from hotel rooms around the world as I do from my office in Dallas, Texas. And even though I have a heavily vested interest in the cabling infrastructure market due to my position at CommScope, when I am working from a hotel room my best option for connectivity is typically provided over a Wi-Fi connection. The challenging part of my expectation is that my requirements for robust connectivity do not change based on my location. I am regularly logged in over the corporate VPN to email, CRM and a variety of other network applications, all while trying to participate in a video meeting over the very same connection.   

hotel

Similarly, much of my family and parenting time when traveling is handled in the same fashion. Having three teen/tween kids who prefer to interact over FaceTime, the model typically works okay assuming that my connectivity is solid. To complete my total and complete dependence on robust internet connectivity when I’m on the road, my downtime typically involves streaming my favorite Netflix, Amazon Prime or Hulu shows on my iPad…once again over Wi-Fi.

I guess you can say that there is nothing particularly unique about this model or the volume of content that I consume daily. I’m just one of the thousands of road warriors whose expectations and requirements for reliable bandwidth increase each and every day.

Hotel Backend Infrastructure

Because of my profession, I am also a road warrior who fully understands and appreciates that many of the hotels I stay in have invested heavily to install next-generation wireless access points (APs) to accommodate this ever-growing trend of data consumption. In theory, these access points should enable guests and staff to enjoy a fast and reliable connection throughout the hotel in guest rooms, business centers, restaurants, gyms, and lobbies. In fact, this feature is no longer “nice to have” but rather a hard requirement to keep rooms occupied with business travelers. I also realize that simply installing new …

State of Email Security for 2019

State of Email Security for 2019

Email has been an irreplaceable blessing and a cruel curse to the cybersecurity of business over the years. Email connects the employees as well as the rest of the world. However, because email connects employees to the rest of the world, email has also come to be the largest vulnerability of any organization. In fact, recent studies report that 94% of companies will experience an email-related malicious attack. 

These attacks are generally phishing attacks such as emails requesting money transfers and fraud based attacks such as impersonation of third party vendors. Email is the easiest point of contact for other users, external or internal, to interact with employees and attempt malicious attacks. Reasons for improving email security are endless and companies are looking for solutions to remedy potential vulnerabilities in their systems.

Vulnerabilities are Increasing

The amount of email-based attacks towards a company has consistently seen a rise in recent years. As the world moves further and further along with the use of the internet and emails, this trend isn’t likely to see any change. IT departments are finding it increasingly difficult to protect the company and increase email security. In fact, 61% of businesses believe that they will likely or inevitably suffer an email-borne attack. 

Companies are continuing to promote email safety protocols and educate employees on the proper usage of email. Through these efforts, they hope to minimize security risks and improve vulnerability management. However, while these efforts to increase employee ability to spot cyber attacks have increased, only 25% of companies are providing training to actively increase email security. This training is commonly in the form of group sessions or informative videos. Some companies even go as far as having one on one sessions with employees to ensure that they understand the risk involved in email and that they keep the company safe while using it.

Effects of Attacks on Businesses

Many of these email-borne attacks have had direct effects on the functioning and profits of the organization. Specifically for email-based impersonation attacks, organizations have reported that:…

What Are The Different Kinds Of Computers?

We use computers for different reasons and different tasks. But either we’re at the office or not, computers remain the same in terms of function. They write documents, save media files, send emails, let you search the web, tabulate data, update your social media, and all the computing processes there is. But these computers are the ones that we commonly know of. There are other types that seem unfamiliar with most people. Even these computers we use in the office or at home can differ from each other base on how heavy we use them. For example, if you are active on social media, you can always use a computer to update or upload files. But if you use it for business or as a job, then you will need a computer that’s best suited for more creative tasks.

 

Now let’s check out the other types of computers.

 

Supercomputers. You might have probably heard of this one. These are the fastest and biggest computers that exist. They are used to calculate weather patterns, quantum physics, and even perform mock nuclear weapon detonation.

The “Father of Supercomputing,” Seymour Cray, built the first supercomputer in 1963 called the CDC 6600, according to Cray Inc. He founded the company Cray Research to focus on engineering supercomputer systems. Supercomputers provide the fastest processing speed of any computer. Used for highly complex calculations, supercomputers possess extreme processing capabilities. For example, the Jaguar, a Cray Inc. supercomputer, operates at 1750 Teraflops (floating point operations per second) at peak performance—which means the system can calculate 1,750,000 Gigabytes per second. Supercomputers work behind the scenes to drive the most advanced information research forward. They are used for various highly specified applications including weather research, quantum physics, nuclear weapon detonation simulations and a class of problems called the “Grand Challenge problems,” a set of problems requiring a high-performance computer.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/types-of-computers-their-functions)

 

Mid-range computers are called so after the rise of desktop computers. They were used to do various applications.

The mid-range computer, originally called the

The Challenges of Using a Computer

If there is something that mankind has so successfully, effectively, and profitably invented, it’s the computer, the first vessel for the other triumphantly discovered internet.

 

Computers have made great strides ever since their creation. Historically, computing was first related to numbers. And the earliest tool recognized to count numbers was the abacus. Hence, the name computer.

 

Computers are useful in many different fields both at home and at work.

They can be used as research tools, scouring the internet and online databases for information about all different topics. Information that’s found can easily be downloaded and saved or printed to hard copy.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

There’s not one office that doesn’t have a computer. In fact, they might be the most functional and operational items in the office. That’s all thanks to their multitasking skills of writing documents, sending emails, making presentations, scheduling meetings, doing training, etc.

Computers are also often more efficient for producing written work, whether a financial spreadsheet where numbers are automatically totaled up without the need of a calculator or a word processing document with automatic spellchecking and easy, paper-free editing.

Documents created on a computer can also easily be backed up, shared and searched, unlike paper documents that need to be stored in secure spaces and physically transported and examined.

They’ve also boosted efficiency in other areas of business by allowing people to work remotely – when on business trips, for example – and by automating tasks in fields like manufacturing.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

At home, you can use it to do shopping, be active on social media, plan your out-of-the-country trip, search for recipes or housekeeping DIYs, and a whole lot more.

Computers can be also convenient shopping tools, making it possible to find any number of products without having to visit a store or thumb through a paper catalog. And they’re excellent for communication, letting people share photos, send emails and disseminate life updates on their own schedules for friends and family to see.

(Via:https://www.techwalla.com/articles/pros-cons-of-the-use-of-computers)

 

So …

Why Outsourced IT Help Desk is NOT a Risky Strategy

An IT help desk can boost productivity and ensure that your technology infrastructure stays functioning optimally. But, building an internal IT help desk team is an expensive, resource-intensive project that involves finding and hiring qualified desktop support technicians, training them on your systems, and making sure that your team stays current with all the new technologies in your network.

Because running an effective IT help desk is so complex, most companies will eventually consider outsourcing this critical service to an external provider – but that isn’t always a silver bullet solution either. Many businesses have difficulty finding a reliable technology partner; they can truly trust to take on this great responsibility, while others just don’t like the idea of losing control of their IT support processes.

During our more than 20 years of service as an elite, IT help desk partner to businesses throughout New York City, we’ve identified four major items that businesses want when looking to work with a managed services provider – then built and refined our service to accommodate them.

customers-satisfied

Manhattan Tech Support Engineers Are NYC-Based

Many people don’t like the sound of the term “outsourced help desk.” It sounds removed or distant, evoking the idea of an anonymous call center in some other state or country. How could a service like that possibly help you achieve your most ambitious, complex business goals? It couldn’t, which is why we designed our service to be the total opposite.

The Manhattan Tech Support help desk solution gives you full access to a team of talented, hard-working, client-focused technicians right here in NYC. We’re very proud to call the city our home and have been working for over 20 years to enrich the business community with superior technology. A world-class help desk built by New Yorkers for New Yorkers – that’s a vision of outsourcing we think businesses and organizations here in the Big Apple can get genuinely excited about.

A Help Desk Staff That Understands Your Company Culture and Goals

The MSP industry has seen terrific growth in …

Should you consider a Private LTE for your business?

The concept of private LTE networks has been discussed for the past several years; however, with CBRS (Citizens Broadband Radio System) finally a reality, the topic is top of mind for many enterprise IT executives.

private LTE

CBRS promises enhanced mobility and range, greater capacity, optimized applications (especially for specific industries), interoperability and new devices. Even with these great advancements, one nagging question remains, “What benefit is a private LTE network to my business?

To answer that question, iGR teamed up with SmartGig Media to host a series of events, “Private LTE for Enterprise,” with the first one kicking off on November 6 in Dallas, Texas. This one-day program details the history of private LTE, the unique nature of OnGo and CBRS technology, how spectrum sharing platforms can work for you and more.  Readers of this blog have an opportunity to attend the event for free – keep reading!

I discussed the event with Iain Gillott, founder of iGR, and he said, “Private LTE networks are game-changing technologies that provide maximum mobile coverage and ubiquitous connectivity – inside buildings, in high-traffic venues (i.e., stadiums, theaters) and in high RF environments such as hospitals, corporate and educational campus facilities.”

CommScope, a Foundation Sponsor of the event, will speak on “The
Business Case for Hospital and Healthcare facilities” as well as answering
questions on a “Ask the Experts” panel. In addition, Commscope will be hosting
a private meeting and demo room to discuss specific enterprise needs and
requirements.

As a special promotion for the event, the first 100 registrations will receive a free Enterprise & CRE Executive Badge or Government & Non-Profit Badge –  go to the registration page for the event and use the PROMO CODE ‘VIP’.

This is a great opportunity for any enterprise IT executive
to gain a comprehensive understanding of the private LTE network opportunity.


Continue reading:
CBRS Spectrum Holds Great Possibilities for Law Enforcement
How hotels can eliminate dead zones with CBRS
WInnForum Approves CommScope as Administrator for CBRS CPI Training