Tag: The Ruckus Room

Marking #20yearsofwifi

During the past two decades, Wi-Fi has connected billions of people around the globe and helped improve countless lives. As the Wi-Fi Alliance notes, Wi-Fi’s inherent strengths have made the ever-evolving IEEE 802.11 one of the greatest success stories of the technology era. Indeed, according to Kevin Robinson, VP of marketing at the WiFi Alliance, Wi-Fi has contributed approximately $2 trillion to the world’s economy – with more than 13 billion Wi-Fi devices in active use worldwide. Moreover, Wi-Fi is the primary medium for global Internet traffic, as more than 80% of traffic on the average smartphone is transferred via Wi-Fi.

Wi-Fi
Photo credit: Kaique Rocha

Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax)

The latest iteration of the wireless standard – Wi-Fi 6 – offers up to a four-fold capacity increase over its Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) predecessor. As we’ve previously discussed on The Ruckus Room, the very first Wi-Fi 6 access points (APs) and client devices hit the market only recently. Nevertheless, IDC analysts see Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) deployments ramping significantly throughout 2019 and becoming the dominant enterprise Wi-Fi standard by 2021. Meanwhile, Christian Kim, Senior Analyst IoT, Connectivity and Telecom Electronics at IHS Markit, estimates that total Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) device shipments will increase to 58 million units in 2021.

Aside from offering a four-fold capacity increase over its predecessor, Wi-Fi 6 enables multiple APs deployed in dense device environments to collectively deliver required quality-of-service (QoS) to more clients with more diverse usage profiles. This is made possible by a range of technologies that optimize spectral efficiency, increase throughput and reduce power consumption. These include Multi-User Multiple Input Multiple Output (MU-MIMO), Target Wake Time (TWT), Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiple Access (OFDMA), BSS Coloring and 1024-QAM.

The Ruckus R730 Wi-Fi 6 Access Point

In addition to implementing the above technologies, Ruckus’ R730 Wi-Fi 6 AP supports a range of supplemental technologies that go well beyond the 802.11ax standard, including:

  • Airtime decongestion — Increases average client throughput in heavily congested environments by using patent-pending techniques to reduce unnecessary management traffic.
  • Transient

Ruckus amplifies the fan experience at Chesapeake Energy Arena

Large public venues (LPV) have unique characteristics and challenges that make them different than most other environments. This is certainly true of the modular Chesapeake Energy Arena. On any given day, you might find the floor of the Chesapeake Energy Arena covered in two feet of dirt (for professional bull riding), or a concert stage (for top music artists), or a hardwood court (for the resident Oklahoma City Thunder basketball team).

Chesapeake Energy Arena

The owners of the 581,000 square foot stadium recently decided to upgrade the arena network to bolster fan engagement. We all know the feeling of frustration when you can’t get your mobile device to connect. Let’s face it, we live in a world where technology is front and center. An LPV network needs to be reliable to ensure the continuous generation of revenue. However, these venues are often treated like all the others when it comes to deploying a network solution which just leads to frustration.

The Chesapeake Energy Arena started by replacing its wired network. They installed Ruckus’ ICX switches at the core, distribution and access layers. “We went from a 1 GB backbone to 20 GB with scalability up to 160 GB. Network performance went through the roof. The stability was rock solid,” states Christopher Nelson, IT manager for SMG.

When it came time for the wireless side of the network, the arena required a vendor that could provide high-quality connections at higher data rates in a unique setting. Since the venue has retractable seats, it was imperative that the access points (APs) be mounted on the trusses and catwalks at the top of the arena. Several vendors were evaluated based on price, security, and ease of management. “Only Ruckus could span from the top of the arena to the floor level, a distance of almost 100 feet. My goal was to create a Wi-Fi cloud around the arena—the perfect blanket of coverage. I wasn’t even sure it was possible, but we did it with Ruckus Wi-Fi,” comments Nelson.

This is no small feat. However, with …

Senators eye federal funding for school bus Wi-Fi

Funding Rolling Study HallsA bipartisan group of senators recently re-introduced legislation to update the Federal Communications Commission’s E-rate program. More specifically, the revised program would see the federal government reimburse school districts for installing Wi-Fi on school buses. According to Sen. Tom Udall (D-New Mexico), equipping school buses with Wi-Fi will help end the homework gap and set kids up for success.

Wi-Fi

“When we increase access to high-speed internet, we increase access to opportunities,” Udall stated in a press release. “By extending internet access to students while they commute to and from school, this bill would turn travel time into study time, enabling kids to complete their homework before they get home.”

Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nevada) expressed similar sentiments.

“Lack of access to reliable broadband hurts children from rural and low-income communities who may not have quality internet access where they live,” said Masto. “This legislation will help bridge that divide.”

Bridging the Homework Gap

According to Ruckus education director Rich Nedwich, school bus Wi-Fi offers another way for children to gain access to a quality Internet connection.

“Many American children from rural areas have to ride the bus for 1-2 hours a day just to get to and from school,” Nedwich told Stephanie Kinch of Wi-Fi Now. “Traditionally, this time has been used for gossip and naps. Now, it can be used for something more productive: Homework. Learning needs to happen outside the classroom and if it isn’t happening at home, we need another solution. We are part of that solution.”

Nedwich also emphasized that simply equipping a school bus with Wi-Fi doesn’t solve all problems.

“We don’t pretend it does,” he added. “But it does provide another way to give students access.”

Wi-Fi and the Ruckus M510 Access Point

Whether in the classroom or a rolling study hall, a reliable wireless network that scales to accommodate an evolving digital learning environment is the cornerstone of a solid educational foundation. This is precisely why the Ruckus M510 Access Point (AP) is designed to provide mobile Wi-Fi with …

Wi-Fi: $2 trillion and more than 13 billion devices

Kevin Robinson, VP of marketing at the WiFi Alliance, recently noted that Wi-Fi has contributed approximately $2 trillion to the world’s economy – with more than 13 billion Wi-Fi devices in active use worldwide. According to Robinson, Wi-Fi is the primary medium for global Internet traffic, as more than 80% of traffic on the average smartphone is transferred via Wi-Fi.

Wi-Fi

Today’s Wi-Fi: A victim of its own success

“While Wi-Fi has been incredibly successful, its success has brought a number of challenges,” he states.  “[Because] Wi-Fi [is] being used so broadly in different device types for different data applications, we see a very broad mix of data traversing Wi-Fi networks, which can ultimately lead to inefficiencies in how Wi-Fi is using a wireless medium.”

As Robinson explains, Wi-Fi is being utilized in ultra-dense deployments to provide coverage for stadiums and transportation hubs where the unscheduled, contention-based access paradigm of traditional Wi-Fi technologies can be problematic.

“We’re seeing Wi-Fi networks increasingly used to deliver connectivity between buildings in either enterprise or maybe city-wide deployments – and there are challenges that go along with that as well,” he adds.

Wi-Fi 6: Bridging the performance gap towards ten gigabit speeds

Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax), says Robinson, can help address the above-mentioned issues and limitations.

“The benefits of Wi-Fi 6 become more pronounced as you add more devices to the network. This is important for dense deployments in the enterprise, university campuses, as well as residential areas,” he elaborates. “Wi-Fi 6 delivers diverse capabilities. Because of the ubiquity of Wi-Fi, it is the primary connectivity means in everything from AR and VR headsets to IoT devices… Wi-Fi 6 [also] delivers a more deterministic experience, meaning a more consistent user experience, regardless of the environment.”

Indeed, as we’ve previously discussed on the Ruckus Room, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has ratified five major iterations of the 802.11 Wi-Fi protocol, culminating with Wi-Fi 5 (802.11ac) in 2013. However, despite a significant increase in speed, many organizations still find themselves limited …

Ruckus takes on the competition with the R730 Wi-Fi 6 AP

The Ruckus Technical Marketing Engineering team recently pitted the company’s flagship R730 Wi-Fi 6 (802.11ax) access point against competing Wi-Fi 6 APs from vendor 1 and vendor 2. All tests were performed in a classroom with 60 MacBook Pro clients (802.11ac) connected to the 5GHz radio of each AP. It should be noted that one of the APs from a competing vendor had its second software defined radio turned off for these tests as well.

AP

The AP Contenders

All APs were powered up using multi-gig ports of the ICX 7650 switch. WPA2-PSK encryption was enabled for the tests with an encrypted SSID. The Ixia Chariot testing software was used with endpoint software installed on each client device. TCP frame size was set at a standard 1460.

The results? The R730 beat the competition by as much as 33% in downlink tests and 25% to 33% for uplink. These tests are with 802.11ac (Wi-Fi 5) devices, so results are expected to be even better when Wi-Fi 6 clients begin shipping in volume this year.

R730

TCP-DL/UP Results

This test is useful when looking at performance with maximum frame size. However not all traffic uses large frame sizes. As a matter of fact, most applications don’t. What happens when we use smaller frame sizes?

The next benchmark test clearly illustrates Ruckus’
advantage with small packets.

This test is notable because smaller packet sizes (65 bytes in this test) create higher CPU utilization on the AP. The reason vendor 1 and vendor 2 AP results flatline (or worse) is that they are hitting 100% CPU usage in the tests. Due to a superior CPU architecture, the R730 yields twice the throughput of the next best competitor. In real-world terms, this means the R730 delivers superior performance and user experience in deployments where smaller packet size is a crucial makeup in application traffic mix such as a large-scale VoIP deployment.

A similar trend is seen with packet sizes of 256 bytes, 512 bytes, and 900 bytes. The Ruckus R730 consistently outperformed the vendor 2 by …

1 AP per classroom – part 4: the whys and wherefores of the rest of the checklist

If you skipped part 3, The answer is not 42. It’s Channel Planning, well, don’t. Go back and read it, as 80% or more of the answers are there. Nevertheless, there are a couple more things one can do to tune a lot of APs in a small space for the best overall performance.

AP

Lower the power,
especially on R730s

Possibly the most controversial suggestion from a Ruckus Networks point of view, but the R730 is very powerful device. As a company, we have traditionally pushed maximizing what you can get out of a single AP, but our entire exercise here follows from the idea that we have more APs than we need.

In this case, we really want to cover only one classroom,
and we don’t want signal leaking out much past that room and its immediate
surroundings – there are other APs there. In a first after over nine years at
Ruckus, I’m recommending turning the power down on an AP. In this specific scenario,
where an R730 will be in such close proximity to neighboring R730s. The clients
in the same room will be at point blank range with minimal obstructions and no
walls. Here, we are much more concerned with reducing self-interference of the
network as a whole.

For other AP models, rely on a site survey to see whether or
not you have already gotten enough RF separation from the 20 MHz channel
setting before doing this. More on that below.

Raise the BSS minrate
to 12 Mbps or 24 Mbps

By now, this should be a standard recommendation
anyway.  The BSS minrate is the minimum
speed at which a device is allowed to connect to a WLAN. The default is 2 Mbps
on a Ruckus network, and 1 Mbps from most vendors. Those numbers were set
several Wi-Fi generations ago, and are unreasonably slow in WLANs with maximum
speeds well over the 11 Mbps.

Raising this will go a long way toward eliminating ‘sticky client’ problems that some clients suffer from. We don’t …

It’s the network, stupid

Enterprise IoT Deployments require a bottoms up approach to be successful

James Carville, famed campaign strategist for Bill Clinton
in 1992, facing an incumbent President with a post-Gulf War approval rating of
90{56382b05406e22b986d72489f434f32729ef758e2e5cbf8f56cdc0c3bdfc886a}, a year and a half before the election, coined the phrase, “the economy,
stupid”, to remind all staffers to concentrate on the importance of economic
issues.  It was short, pointed and
effective.  Similarly, when I look at
enterprises trying to deploy IoT networks, too many are focusing on a specific
use case or some payoff from big data, when they must remember, all successful
IoT deployments starts with the network.

Network

Enterprise IoT deployments need a bottoms up approach

First, some definitions:

  • Bottoms up = build wireless network (Wi-Fi +
    IoT).  Stable, scalable, secure – then
    build solutions on top of it
  • Top down = find a solution to focused
    problem.  Create an overlay network to
    connect app to a “thing”. 

Every house needs a solid foundation.  You would not want your electrician pouring
concrete, nor would you want your brick layer to work on your plumbing.  So why do we feel comfortable with sensor,
device or manufacturers of “things” providing the components for an enterprise network?  We shouldn’t. 
Thing vendors make things, and network vendors make networks. In
addition, each device vendor only cares about their own device, which means
their own network. Deploying a network for one device type adds complexity,
adds cost, is highly redundant and has the potential to create security
holes. 

Benefits of a bottoms up network

Just as James Carville beseeched his staffers to focus on the economy as a primary driver for success, so to do I beseech Enterprise IT and OT managers to think about the network first.  It will serve you well and provide significant benefits. And here are things to consider in making make a stable, scalable, secure, cost-effective IoT access network that can meet the needs of an enterprise IoT ecosystem.

  1. World-class backbone – enterprise-grade wired and wireless infrastructure.
  2. Integrated front end – AP supporting best of

Ruckus talks 5G and IoT at MWC 2019

The Ruckus Room recently caught up with Ruckus CTO Mehmet Yavuz and Ruckus VP Greg Beach on the sidelines of a very busy MWC 2019 to discuss 5G and the IoT.

5G

As
Yavuz tells The Ruckus Room, 5G is an
extremely hot topic at the conference in Barcelona. While enhanced mobile
broadband is certainly something to look forward to, says Yavuz, the deployment
of 5G also brings its own set of very real challenges, particularly since 80{56382b05406e22b986d72489f434f32729ef758e2e5cbf8f56cdc0c3bdfc886a}
of mobile data is consumed indoors.

“The traditional cellular deployment model has big macros outside with outdoor
antennas. This is a really good model for wide-area outdoor coverage. However, 5G
uses the spectrum band – at the higher end of the spectrum at 3.5 gigahertz or even
higher,” he explains.

“[This makes it] difficult for the signal to penetrate indoors. So, you really need an indoor solution [such as CBRS private LTE] to help solve these indoor data demands. The indoor solution also needs to be scalable, low-cost and easy to deploy.”

Another important aspect of 5G, says Yavuz, is its expected ability to support mission-critical applications.

“You hear about ultra-reliable low latency or millisecond latency and these are targeted at high-end applications,” he elaborates. “It may be a venue [with a need to support] AR/VR, or it may be a factory [supporting] automation. [These applications] all require edge compute capabilities because you don’t have the luxury of using traditional mobile core networks ”

Yavuz also touched on the IoT, noting that there are a plethora of available technologies on the market today.

“We bring all these [disparate] technologies together under one umbrella with our Ruckus IoT suite,” he says. “For the IT department or the operational department, this means there is only one network to manage. For us, what is really important is simplicity, performance and the complete solution.”

Overall, notes Yavuz, the picture for 2019 and beyond looks quite exciting.

“We have all these great technologies coming together with our partners. We’re bringing all these great applications …

Ruckus Networks Appoints Eric Law to VP of EMEA Sales

Ruckus Networks, an ARRIS company, welcomes Eric Law as Vice President of EMEA Sales. In this role, he will be responsible for leading marketing, sales, and operations throughout the region.

Eric Law

“Eric is a highly-regarded industry leader who strategically supports partner, enterprise and channel communities to drive business success,” said Bart Giordano, Sr. Vice President, Worldwide Sales. “We’re confident that Eric will help grow our existing efforts in EMEA, and we’re excited to welcome him to the Ruckus pack.”

Eric previously spent more than 17 years
with Cisco driving results and scaling the business in enterprise and channel
leadership positions. He later joined Purple to lead its worldwide sales
operations. He grew the business from the ground-up and defined the company’s
go-to-market strategy, including proving the impact of a SaaS business model. Eric
will leverage his extensive background to bring strategic growth opportunities
to customers, partners and the company. He will also extend Ruckus’ presence in
vertical markets.

“I was first attracted to Ruckus because of
its partner loyalty and passion; it was unlike anything I’d seen before,” said
Law. “The quality of its people is unmatched, both in their perseverance and in
their hunger to achieve results. The technology is exceptional and speaks for
itself. I see tremendous growth opportunities for us in EMEA.”

After 22 years living in Spain, Eric has a deep-rooted understanding of the European, African, and Middle Eastern market (as well as a soft spot for the Real Madrid football team).

The post Ruckus Networks Appoints Eric Law to VP of EMEA Sales appeared first on The Ruckus Room.

from The Ruckus Room https://theruckusroom.ruckuswireless.com/wired-wireless/company-news/ruckus-networks-appoints-eric-law-to-vp-of-emea-sales/…

Ruckus Networks Appoints Eric Law to VP of EMEA Sales

Ruckus Networks, an ARRIS company, welcomes Eric Law as Vice President of EMEA Sales. In this role, he will be responsible for leading marketing, sales, and operations throughout the region.

Eric Law

“Eric is a highly-regarded industry leader who strategically supports partner, enterprise and channel communities to drive business success,” said Bart Giordano, Sr. Vice President, Worldwide Sales. “We’re confident that Eric will help grow our existing efforts in EMEA, and we’re excited to welcome him to the Ruckus pack.”

Eric previously spent more than 17 years
with Cisco driving results and scaling the business in enterprise and channel
leadership positions. He later joined Purple to lead its worldwide sales
operations. He grew the business from the ground-up and defined the company’s
go-to-market strategy, including proving the impact of a SaaS business model. Eric
will leverage his extensive background to bring strategic growth opportunities
to customers, partners and the company. He will also extend Ruckus’ presence in
vertical markets.

“I was first attracted to Ruckus because of
its partner loyalty and passion; it was unlike anything I’d seen before,” said
Law. “The quality of its people is unmatched, both in their perseverance and in
their hunger to achieve results. The technology is exceptional and speaks for
itself. I see tremendous growth opportunities for us in EMEA.”

After 22 years living in Spain, Eric has a deep-rooted understanding of the European, African, and Middle Eastern market (as well as a soft spot for the Real Madrid football team).

The post Ruckus Networks Appoints Eric Law to VP of EMEA Sales appeared first on The Ruckus Room.

from The Ruckus Room https://theruckusroom.ruckuswireless.com/wired-wireless/company-news/ruckus-networks-appoints-eric-law-to-vp-of-emea-sales/…