Live Silver Prices – Updated every second – Multiple Currencies

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Silver Prices Per Ounce (USD Chart):

Silver Prices Per Ounce (USD)

Silver Prices Per Ounce (USD)

Silver Ounce Price (Euro Chart):

Silver Ounce Price (Euro Chart)

Silver Ounce Price (Euro Chart)

Spot Silver (Australian Dollar Chart):

Spot Silver (Australian Dollar Chart)

Spot Silver (Australian $ Chart)

Spot Silver Price (Canadian Dollar Chart):

Spot Silver Price (Canadian $ Chart)

Spot Silver Price (CAD $ Chart)

Spot Price Of Silver Chinese Yuan (CNY Chart):

Spot Price Of Silver Chart (CNY)

Spot Price Of Silver Chart (CNY)

Price Of Silver Per Ounce (Hong Kong Dollar Chart):

Price Of Silver Per Ounce (HKD Chart)

Price Of Silver Per Ounce (HKD)

Silver Price Per Ounce (Indian Rupee Chart):

Silver Price Per Ounce (INR Chart)

Silver Price Per Ounce (INR)

Silver Price (Japanese Yen Chart):

Silver Price (Japanese Yen Chart)

Silver Price (Japanese Yen Chart)

Silver Prices (Mexican Peso Chart):

Silver Prices (Mexican Peso Chart)

Silver Prices (Mexican Peso Chart)

Price Of Silver (New Zealand Dollar/Kiwi):

Price Of Silver (NZD Chart)

Price Of Silver (NZD Chart)

Silver Prices Per Ounce (Great British Pound):

Silver Prices Per Ounce (GBP)

Silver Prices Per Ounce (GBP)

Spot Silver (Russian Rouble Chart):

Spot Silver Chart (Russian Rouble)

Spot Silver (Russian Roubles)

Spot Silver Price (South African Rand):

Spot Silver Price (ZAR)

Spot Silver Price (ZAR)

Spot Price Of Silver (Swiss Franc):

Spot Price Of Silver (CHF)

Spot Price Of Silver (CHF)

Silver Ounce Price (Turkish Lira):

Silver Ounce Price (TRY)

Silver Ounce Price (TRY)

Silver Prices And The Silver Market

Silver prices should be stable but they aren’t. Even though silver is mined at a steady rate each year and there is fairly steady demand for products made with silver, prices seem to fall or rise on a whim. Precious metals such as gold and silver have highly volatile prices which an investor or speculator may find attractive. However, before jumping into the market to buy silver as an investment, it’s a good idea to understand how it is bought and sold and why silver prices can change so much.

There are two different ways to purchase silver. It can be physically purchased and possessed in bars or in coins. The investor may hold the metal himself or keep it stored within an investment bank. Since silver bars are very pure, they trade at a constant level that remains fairly high above the market level. This is the simplest approach to trading in silver.

A major flaw with this method of silver investment is that the commodity sold may be modified by an unscrupulous seller. Silver bars may be melted down and mixed with other base metals. These bars can be sold on the open market and fetch a price comparable to bars made from pure silver. An investor must be sure that he is dealing with an honest seller or risk losing large amounts of money.

A second way to buy silver is to purchase an exchange traded fund (ETF). These funds are tied to silver mines and generate interest based on the premise that the price of silver will rise. These funds are volatile and the rumor of a price fall can send investors packing. Attempting to make a living from silver ETFs is best done by the strongest of heart (or craziest of gamblers).

The price of precious metals can be manipulated by banks and large stock holders. Most long term investors counsel patience when dealing in silver and savvy investors bide their time. As with most commodities, the price of silver goes through seasonal ups and downs and investors should carefully track trends before purchasing for the first time. The rising market trend over the past several years can be attributed to the entry of the rising upper and middle classes in foreign markets as well as feelings of financial insecurity due to volatility in the stock market.

Those new hordes of investors are likely to keep precious metal prices elevated for the foreseeable future. Also, as industrial usage of precious metals grows, so does the demand which further drives the price up. A canny investor will bide his or her time and wait until the price drops precipitously before he buys. Many new investors will become interested when they take note of rapidly rising prices during a silver rebound and ETFs and silver stock can easily be sold at a profit.

As long as interest rates remain low, interest in precious metals has traditionally remained high. Silver is hoarded as a hedge against inflation but with the rise in silver within high tech products, it has become much more volatile than its cousin, gold. For this reason, the silver market is more difficult to get a handle on and investors can easily position themselves to lose a great deal of money. A major advantage to trading in ETFs is their liquidity over time.

In the past, an investment in silver was seen as a poor choice. However, as the industrial demand for silver increases, the supply of silver decreases. Most metals used in the manufacturing process may be extracted once the machine is no longer wanted. However, silver is used in such minute amounts in today’s technological marvels that it is not feasible to recycle it.

This means that not only does silver intrinsically have value as a unit of monetary exchange but that it is also a valuable commodity used in the creation of the most in-demand products on the market today. Since silver mining levels have remained stable for many years, the overall supply level of this precious metal is slowly declining. Those facts add up to an interesting mix for a patient trader and a remarkable opportunity to add to your financial portfolio. Now that you understand some of the behavior of silver prices on the silver market, start tracking and get ready to invest.

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