Audio from the Moody Radio “Dad Mom” Debate Is Here

A good number of folks have asked about audio from my recent debate on stay-at-home dads on Moody Radio.  Click on this link to hear the debate: Listen.

Info on the conversation, hosted by the dexterous Julie Roys and joined by the good-hearted Matt Peregoy, is below.  I appreciated this discussion, even as I continue to view the trend of “stay-at-home dads” or “dad moms” as generally unbiblical and unhealthy.

September 15, 2012

Stay-at-home dads: they’re becoming more common, but does this model violate God’s design for men and women? This Saturday on Up For Debate, host Julie Roys discusses the issue with “The Real Matt Daddy”—a Christian stay-at-home dad who argues fathers can serve just as well as mothers as primary caretakers. Also joining Julie will be Owen Strachan, a theology professor at Boyce College, who says the “Dad Mom” is a “man fail.”  Don’t miss this challenging and lively discussion this Saturday at 8 a.m. on Up For Debate!

Featured: Dr. Owen Strachan , Matt Peregoy
Host: Julie Roys

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11 Comments

Filed under fatherhood, manhood

11 responses to “Audio from the Moody Radio “Dad Mom” Debate Is Here

  1. Pingback: Is the Stay-at-Home Dad a Man-Fail? | Denny Burk

  2. Don Johnson

    Hi Owen,

    I am a Biblical egalitarian, as I follow Jesus, who was egalitarian in 1st century culture as was Paul, Peter, etc.

    If you wish to discuss why I think your are eisegeting these passages, I am available. I agree this is your blog and you are moderator here.

  3. Owen, brother, I always appreciate getting to hear your insights and I was hopeful that you and Mr. Peregoy might be able to produce some important and distinct points of view on this subject. As you pointed out, the question of the husband-wife work/home relationship should start with our Biblical convictions rather than being driven by the uber-practical bottom-line of mere economics. Some folks might come to different conclusions on the matter due to individual circumstances, but the question should always be rooted in theology.

    If I may add a note of criticism, however, I must say I was disappointed in how little “debate” there actually was in this particular program. The host seemed more interested in personally interacting with phone callers than in allowing both of you to engage each other directly. Thus, the discussion ultimately left me unfulfilled because I think I learned a lot more about what Julie Roys (and Moody Bible Institute) believed than I did about where you and Peregoy might agree and differ. I actually couldn’t recall at what point Peregoy explicitly stated he was outside the complementarian framework. Having never read his blog, I’ll just assume it was already made public and both you and the host were aware of that fact. At times, I felt lost as a non-initiated listener.

    Anyhoo, I am much appreciative to you and Peregoy for being willing to have this discussion, but I am disappointed that the structure of the radio program seemed to distract from the issues in question and thus limit potential insights that listeners like myself may have been able to glean.

  4. owenstrachan

    Appreciate you commenting, Adam. I thought I stated my difference with Peregoy fairly clearly, actually. But I do agree that there could have been more point-for-point debate. It’s a tough act a host has–juggling many callers, two participants, and managing the clock. I was impressed with Julie Roys’s hosting. I do really enjoy more back-and-forth debate, so that needs to be said.

  5. Thanks for the response, Owen. I’ve been a little frustrated with some recent Christian dialogue/debates I’ve seen on TV that end up consisting of the guests stating their respective positions and then having to defend or clarify their views directly to the host as opposed to engaging their POV counterpart.

    I guess maybe I have a different vision as to what the role of a radio/TV host should be.

    That said, keep up the good work and I hope you get the opportunity to dialogue about this and other important subjects in the near future.

  6. Don Johnson

    Owen,

    If you really enjoy more of a back and forth debate, here I am offering it to you on your own blog, where you are the moderator.

    • Don Johnson

      P.S. At this time of my life, I am a stay-at-home dad. We have an egalitarian family and my wife and I decided that this makes the most sense giving our current situation, in other words, our family is more successful than it would be otherwise, if we tried to follow some supposed “roles”.

      • Akash Charles

        Many men have sacrificed promotions in spite of better pay and a more successful family as per your definition. They did this however because of the role designated to them, to ensure their wives who were homemakers were able to joyfully fulfill their role.

        This is harsh, but all of us sin and a stay at home dad is blatant disobedience to GOD (unless you are unable to work for a physical reason) and is a sign of not planning ahead to provide for your family but rather laziness and not much respect for GOD and your wife.

      • Don Johnson

        Pretty judgmental Akash. Thanks be to God I do not read the Scriptures as you do, so I do not accept your analysis.

  7. Ryan

    I thought christians were against post modernism? Why are christian leaders still teaching relative morality?

  8. three to eight words as the important thing words within the whole research paper. User stories are quick to publish and is certain to get all levels in the organization structure involved.

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