Things You Should Be Reading: Credo Magazine on Solus Christus

This just in from Credo: issue number two is out.  It’s on “In Christ Alone,” what the reformers called Solus Christus, and it looks like a humdinger.

Here’s the teaser:

“In Christ Alone” – The January issue of Credo Magazine is here!

The January issue argues for the exclusivity of the gospel, especially in light of the movement known as inclusivism. This issue will seek to answer questions like: Can those who have never heard the gospel of Christ be saved? Will everyone be saved in the end or will some spend an eternity in hell? Must someone have explicit faith in Christ to be saved? Contributors include David Wells, Robert Peterson, Michael Horton, Gerald Bray, Todd Miles, Todd Borger, Ardel Caneday, Nathan Finn, Trevin Wax, Michael Reeves, and many others.

As you can see, the second issue of Credo features an impressive list of contributors.

One great feature of this new publication is the “Ten Questions” with a leading theologian.  The January 2012 issue features David Wells of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, one of my favorite thinkers and writers.  Here’s a snatch from the interview:

Credo: To many leading evangelicals, you are a father figure in many ways. But when you first entered the teaching ministry who did you look up to the most?

Wells: I was deeply shaped by Martyn Lloyd-Jones, whose church I attended twice a week in London, by Schaeffer with whom my wife and I worked, by John Stott with whom I lived for five years, and I always had the highest regard for Carl Henry.  I never found him incomprehensible as others said they did but, on the contrary, he was for me a model of what theologians should be doing.  I always wished that Karl Barth’s immense talent and majestic vision had been worked out a little differently but I always appreciated reading him even when I had to argue with him.

About these ads

3 Comments

Filed under credo magazine

3 responses to “Things You Should Be Reading: Credo Magazine on Solus Christus

  1. Christiane

    I think people may have missed something in the Gospel of St. Matthew, but I am not sure:

    take a look at the verses concerning the ‘sheep’ and the ‘goats’ in St. Matthew 25:31-46.

    Seems that the ‘recognition of Our Lord’ was not limited to the Holy Name alone. Is it possible that some have misunderstood what it means to say ‘yes’ to Christ?
    Or underestimated the ‘encounters’ described in these verses, as to their importance in final judgment?

    Speaking the Holy Name apparently is ‘not enough’ in these verses. But in these verses, what IS the standard Our Lord applies to who will be saved and who will be accorded the reward due to the ‘goats’, if calling His Name as ‘Lord’ is ‘not enough’ ?

  2. “Can those who have never heard the gospel of Christ be saved? Will everyone be saved in the end or will some spend an eternity in hell? Must someone have explicit faith in Christ to be saved?”

    Crap. I thought you were going to answer those questions here.

    Guess I’ll have to get the mag. Someday.

  3. owenstrachan

    Christiane, great questions. I think you’re right; true faith involves not merely assenting to belief in the lordship and saving work of Jesus Christ, but being wholly transformed by him. This is how we make sense of James 2, I think, and 1 John (the whole letter). If we do not love God and love others in demonstrable ways, there is every reason to think that we do not know the Lord as we might claim.

    This is where the Puritan “test of assurance” or “syllogism” is helpful. If we claim to have faith, and can identify spiritual fruit in our lives (and our fellow church members can as well!), then we have assurance. If we claim to have faith, and cannot identify spiritual fruit in our lives, then we do not.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s