Serving Him, of course.

Baseball Uniforms Should Be Crisp

mannyThis is a cross-post from the blog of Vitamin Z, where I am guest-blogging this week.

I don’t know about you, but I find baggy baseball uniforms weird.  So does Wesley Morris, writing “The Sportstorialist” at  Morris writes with a crisp, tongue-in-cheek style of recent sartorial changes to baseball uniforms:

There’s no functional reason for a baseball jersey to evoke the National Hockey League, but there were the Brewers, baggy in uncharacteristic Dijon mustard, calling to mind the Boston Bruins. After most plays, assorted batters and outfielders could be seen tucking in their shirts. (Surely, someone at home was delighted to see adjustments occur at the belt rather than below it.) Eventually, the pads on Rickie Weeks’ elbows began to eat his sleeves. By the time Casey McGehee crossed the plate on a sixth-inning Corey Hart double, the improbable had occurred. His shirt had managed to billow from his pants without coming untucked. Apparently the shirttail found McGehee’s inadvertent dishevelment as embarrassing as some of us did. 
You won’t necessarily agree with the entirety of the column, but I appreciated the point, if only because I admit that I have always found the baggy baseball uniform distasteful.  I like baggy shorts in basketball …

Great Books: Josh Moody’s “No Other Gospel”

joshmoodyWithout a doubt, one of the preachers I most look up to and learn from is Josh Moody of College Church in Wheaton, Illinois.  Josh is a humble man with an outsize résumé–BA from Cambridge, PhD from Cambridge (in none other than Jonathan Edwards), missionary to Georgia (the country, not the Dawgs) and Azerbaijan, husband to Rochelle and father of three adorable children.

If you are a looking for examples of the modern pastor-theologian, you should look directly and sustainedly at Dr. Moody’s ministry.  He reminds me of D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones, the “Doctor,” due to the intelligence, crispness of expression, and soaring view of God found in his preaching.  College Church is a historic church (Kent Hughes formerly pastored it) and it just celebrated its 150th anniversary.  It is in the hands of a faithful expositor of God’s Word, one whose preaching reminds me of the speakers and leaders one finds in such organizations as Together for the Gospel and The Gospel Coalition.  If you have not listened to Josh’s sermons, do so immediately (and here’s his website).  Here’s what Josh says about his passion:

My passion is the gospel.  By that I don’t mean the cheap, cheesy, man-centered gospel that tells you that heaven can be won